Monday, September 13, 2010

Hangman Creek Trestle: Brownfields Part 2

After a little prodding from Lost Rail's good friend, Oil-Electric, I've put together a link to the bridge abutment's location on the western edge of Spokane:


View Larger Map

The abutment stands, more or less, at the point where W. Ohio Ave and N. Summit meet and points south-east in the above photo.  From here, the old trestle in question would have crossed the Spokane River and Hangman creek on its way across the valley.  A walking bridge now spans the River in the approximate location of the old trestle piers.  When the water level is lower, these are still visible just east of the walking bridge, however, seem covered in the image above.

Also of interest, to the north and east of the abutment are the remains of the old UP round house, still visible from above.  Spokane was quite the railroad town...

3 comments:

Oil-Electric said...

Plot thickens!

"My piers" are different from "Your piers."

"My piers" are just above the letter "v" in "Farm serVices Agency" on Hangman's Creek at bottom of your photo.

Unless you were SCUBA diving, "My piers" are more likely, since they are out of water, whilst "Your piers" are inundated!

However, in the final analysis, obviously both sets of piers are part of the same structure used by OR&N and Milwaukee.

And, more important - you were there not I!

(Cut'n Paste; then "click" image to enlarge it)

http://s632.photobucket.com/albums/uu47/tyee99/Album_01/?action=view&current=My-Piers-Your-Piers.jpg

LinesWest said...

Hi O-E, you're right, clearly the same piers for the OR&N/Milwaukee structure. I went looking for an old photograph or map of the railroad in the area. This isn't the best, but does provide a couple small views of the area:

http://www.greenstonehomes.com/communities/kendall-yards/history.html

The relocations undertaken by the city in the 70s are nothing short of shocking, whether you like them or not.

Take care everyone,
-Leland

SDP45 said...

I've walked around this area extensively, and it was quite a trip to see the turntable pit is still there.
It would seem that development will soon take over the whole former UP shop area, much like it has the east UP shop area.
The book "Union Pacific Northwest" by Jeff Asay has some very nice period photos of the UP in this area.

Dan